Honiton honours the D Day heroes

PUBLISHED: 16:00 06 June 2019 | UPDATED: 13:11 10 June 2019

D Day veteran Jim Tomlinson with his wife Dorothy at Honiton War Memorial. Picture Hontion RBL

D Day veteran Jim Tomlinson with his wife Dorothy at Honiton War Memorial. Picture Hontion RBL

Archant

A 97-year-old veteran of the Normandy landings lays a wreath at the war memorial

A 97-year-old D Day veteran took part in the act of homage organised by the Honiton Royal British Legion branch to mark the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landings today (Thursday, June 6).

Jim Tomlinson, who was First Officer on a Royal Navy landing craft delivering US Troops to Omaha Beach, laid a wreath on behalf of the Normandy Veterans Association and those who did not return.

Margaret Lewis BEM, of The Honiton Museum, also laid a wreath on behalf of the local RBL branch and the people of the town.

The ceremony which was attended by members of the public took place at the war memorial.

Shortly after midnight on the morning June 6, 1944, Operation Overlord began with the invasion of five beaches over a 50 mile stretch of the French coast at Normandy.

Some 156,000 Allied troops went ashore delivered by an armada of 6,939 landing craft, combat ships and support vessels.

The beaches on D-Day were code named Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. It took a further six days to connect all of the beach heads.

Some 156,000 Allied troops went ashore delivered by an armada of 6,939 landing craft, combat ships and support vessels.

The beaches on D-Day were code named Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. It took a further six days to connect all of the beach heads.

Allied forces came from Great Britain, The USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Poland, France, Norway and Czechoslovakia Landed to liberate occupied France from German control.

It was the largest seaborne land invasion ever encountered in history.

Allied casualties were more than 10,000 on the first day of the Battle of Normandy. It is estimated that a further 9,000 German troops were killed from a defending force of around 50,000 troops. Troops from The Devonshire Regiment took part in the first assault at Gold Beach.

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the Midweek Herald