Area of peace and quiet

PUBLISHED: 10:40 10 September 2008 | UPDATED: 22:19 15 June 2010

WITH reference to the letter published last week from Peter Herridge: How you do go on! You have selected one of the churchyard regulations which are all designed to keep the area a haven of quiet peace. The tone of the church's letter was perhaps unfo

WITH reference to the letter published last week from Peter Herridge: How you do go on! You have selected one of the churchyard regulations which are all designed to keep the area a haven of quiet peace. The tone of the church's letter was perhaps unfortunate but, frankly, your sister should have read the regulations! Flowerpots dotted about the place could create a tripping hazard, especially when blown about by the wind or left untended. In addition, the grass has to be cut either by mower or strimmer so pottery could be more than just a nuisance - bending blades, etc.All the newer graves are supplied with a built-in flower container set in the concreted plinth at the headstone. It takes a minimum of ingenuity to also place small containers on this area to plant longer-lasting plants.I regularly visit my husband's grave at St Michael's and am always uplifted by the abundance of flowers that adorn the headstones - tokens of love that create an almost palpable atmosphere of fond remembrances. V GodfreyHoniton


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