Bid to relax regulations for street trading

PUBLISHED: 12:21 08 June 2016 | UPDATED: 09:16 10 June 2016

St Paul's Church, Honiton.

St Paul's Church, Honiton.

Archant

East Devon District Council (EDDC) launched the first stage of a consultation last week in a bid to boost the local economy, promote high streets and town centres and encourage market traders to flourish.

People are being asked for their views on proposed changes to ease street trading laws.

East Devon District Council (EDDC) launched the first stage of a consultation last week in a bid to boost the local economy, promote high streets and town centres and encourage market traders to flourish. At present, street trading is banned in all but six designated ‘consent streets’ across the district, which include part of Northcote Lane in Honiton, Trinity Square in Axminster, The Esplanade at Seaton (from Fisherman’s Gap to Beach Road) and The Square in Seaton.

Richard Cohen, EDDC deputy chief executive, said: “We have many sole traders in East Devon, as well as a strong farming and food production history, and we want to encourage these businesses to trade actively, whether it is through farmers’ markets, festivals or street stalls. We want to actively encourage opinion about these proposals, as it is vital that we gain as much feedback as possible from everyone involved.”

EDDC is looking to take a ‘more modern approach’ and follow in the footsteps of other councils in the Devon area that have removed blanket restrictions. The council says an increase in street trading areas would allow it to actively and positively manage the quality of trade across the district, with each application being considered on its own merits. Questionnaires have been sent out to councils, some street traders, street trading organisations, councillors, chambers of commerce and some local businesses, but EDDC would like to hear from residents.

To complete a survey, visit: www.eastdevon.gov.uk/streettrading


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Midweek Herald. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Midweek Herald