Owl lucky to survive slurry pit soaking

PUBLISHED: 14:51 26 April 2019 | UPDATED: 09:30 02 May 2019

The tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCA

The tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCA

Archant

Bird found in a filthy state at Broadhembury gets a deep clean

The tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCAThe tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCA

A tawny owl needed a deep-clean after falling into a slurry pit at Broadhembury.

The bird was found in a filthy state by a member of the public on Saturday (April 20).

RSPCA Inspector Marije Zwager was called to collect her.

She said: “The poor tawny owl was in a right state. Her beautiful feathers were absolutely filthy and stuck together with thick, black slurry. I held out little hope she would survive this ordeal.

The tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCAThe tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCA

“She's very lucky to be alive as she very nearly drowned in the slurry.”

Inspector Zwager took the owl to RSPCA West Hatch Wildlife Centre, in Somerset, where staff gave her a deep-clean and bath.

Bel Deering, manager of the wildlife centre, said: “When we admitted the owl she was very cold, sad and dirty. It was hard to tell what condition she was in and whether she would survive due to all the contamination.

“After being warmed up, rested and receiving fluid therapy, she was washed in our specialist bird wash room.

The tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCAThe tawny owl rescued from a slurry pit near Honiton. Picture RSPCA

“Thankfully the slurry came off well and, after drying, a beautiful tawny owl appeared again!”

The owl will now be monitored and, once well enough, released back into the wild near the area where she was found.

* For your own safety, the RSPCA does not recommend handling birds of prey. If you find an animal in need of help please contact the RSPCA's 24-hour emergency line on 0300 1234 999. For more information about how to help injured wild animals, see the RSPCA website

Most Read

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Latest from the Midweek Herald

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists