Lifeline for Seaton Tramway

PUBLISHED: 21:03 09 October 2020 | UPDATED: 21:09 09 October 2020

The tramline along Seaton to Colyton Picture: Seaton Tramway

The tramline along Seaton to Colyton Picture: Seaton Tramway

Archant

Seaton Tramway has received a lifeline grant from the Government’s £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund.

Seaton tramway station Picture: Seaton TramwaySeaton tramway station Picture: Seaton Tramway

As one of 445 heritage organisations across the country set to receive a lifesaving financial boost from the government, Seaton will share £103m to help restart vital reconstruction work and maintenance on cherished heritage sites, keeping venues open and supporting those working in the sector.

The award of £435,100 will directly support wages, major overheads such as track and tram maintenance, and the creation of new offers and opportunities with world class partners and exhibitions.

Colyton Station on the Seaton Tramway Picture: Seaton TramwayColyton Station on the Seaton Tramway Picture: Seaton Tramway

Jenny Nunn, Chief Executive of Seaton Tramway, said: “Having to close the Tramway on March 23, and consequently cancel any income for the next three months, was one of the toughest things any business and employer has had to implement.

“In an unprecedented year for all, I am extremely grateful that the Cultural Recovery Fund has recognised the extreme difficulties faced by tourism and hospitality, and has agreed to support us in this way. The months ahead will still be very challenging but the award also ensures the sustainability of the charity as an important economic driver for the area.”

Seaton Tramway, which is a registered charity, has been operating in Seaton since August 1970 and celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. The Tramway operates a three-mile track between the coastal town of Seaton and the town of Colyton, and has a fleet of 14 trams.

The trams range in age from 1904 to 2007 and include a fleet of heritage trams, which ran on the streets of London, Bournemouth and includes the last surviving tram to run on the streets of Exeter.

Kate Mavor, Chief Executive of English Heritage, added: “This support for our nation’s heritage is fantastic news. Over the last few months, our teams have been working hard to welcome visitors back safely to the great castles, stone circles, abbeys and historic houses in our care. This funding will help us invest to safeguard the historic fabric of these much-loved places, which everyone can learn from and enjoy.”


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