Chef Hugh joins slow ride to Turin

PUBLISHED: 14:09 15 October 2012

Cycle ride from Axminster to raise awareness of depression. Race organiser Maddy Corbin with her boyfriend Nick Johnson who is riding tandem with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. Picture by Alex Walton. Ref mha 3657-42-12AW. To order your copy of this photograph, go to www.midweekherald.co.uk and click on myphotos24

Cycle ride from Axminster to raise awareness of depression. Race organiser Maddy Corbin with her boyfriend Nick Johnson who is riding tandem with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. Picture by Alex Walton. Ref mha 3657-42-12AW. To order your copy of this photograph, go to www.midweekherald.co.uk and click on myphotos24

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River Cottage send-off for 28 cyclists heading from Axminster to italy

Crowds gathered in Trinity Square on Saturday to give 28 cyclists an enthusiastic send off.

They are heading 800 miles to Turin, in Italy, to raise awareness of depression.

The ride is in memory of Uplyme woman Philippa ‘Pip’ Corbin, the River Cottage chef who took her own life, aged 27, in January last year.

Chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall climbed on the back of a tandem to cycle some of the way with the group which hopes to arrive at the food festival Salone del Gusto by October 25.

“The slow ride to Turin” will raise money for The Human Givens Foundation and The Charlie Waller Memorial Trust, both of which help people with depression. Already £20,000 has been collected through sponsorship and donations.

Cycling with them is Philippa’s sister Maddy, 27, who has organised the event with her parents Hugh and Pam, who make up half the four-strong support team along with family friend Caroline Llewellyn and chef and former River Cottage colleague Nomie Dwyer.

To follow the group’s progress or sponsor them, visit their website: www.slowridetoturin.co.uk


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