Displays hard to see

PUBLISHED: 02:01 22 October 2008 | UPDATED: 22:30 15 June 2010

I went to view Tesco's proposals at the Eyre Court Hotel, in Seaton, on Saturday, October 4, and such was the interest I had to queue a considerable time to get in. A disabled friend, using a stick, could not wait that long and I brought her a brochure f

I went to view Tesco's proposals at the Eyre Court Hotel, in Seaton, on Saturday, October 4, and such was the interest I had to queue a considerable time to get in. A disabled friend, using a stick, could not wait that long and I brought her a brochure from the exhibition. It was very crowded and difficult to see the display boards because of the crowd and also because some of the display was very low. There were insufficient written explanations on the boards and the people from Tesco's were inundated with questions, some of which I stopped to listen to. As this was supposed to be a public consultation, I would have thought the most important thing to do was to give people plenty of notice when and where it was going to be, make sure the venue was big enough to accommodate the people and give generous access both into the venue and around the display.No point in doing all the lovely drawings if they don't show exactly what's being offered. A true artist's impression of the elevations on the site and the view of them from various points. Just to be clear, two metres comes roughly to the top of the word Tesco on the hoardings they've erected. The building would be on top of this. Show the steepness of the slopes needed to access the site both by road and pedestrianisation.It would appear that the only questions Tesco wanted us to answer were 1) are you in support of our proposals? 2) would you be in favour of a Ropatec wind turbine? Which rather left me speechless, for a while.When I took the brochure to my disabled friend's and tried to explain to her what I had seen, I was furious about the way it had been written. I really do think someone ought to be responsible for making sure that facts are accurately stated, otherwise it should have been made clear the publication was a piece of fiction.There are so many "errors" that I will mention just a few.Page 2: "Tesco's vision for regenerating the town includes an Eco-store (apparently sticking a wind turbine up and remove some of the labels from clothing balances the eco-damage done by trucking in in-fill on inappropriate roads) a visitor centre (which they're not building) a cycle track (likewise), leisure and tourism facilities (ditto) and new housing (which in the current climate no-one wants either to build or buy).My grandson's vision for Seaton is for a thriving seaside town with lots of shops, things to do, a youth club, a swimming pool, a gym, a nursery...Overall, I got the impression Tesco weren't interested in finding out what we wanted. They've got the land and they'll do as they please. I've shopped at Tesco for more years than I can say, but they've really made me angry. I've been dismayed and am very concerned if this town's future is left in their hands.Bob WhiteHarepath RoadSeaton


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