Girl, 12, stranded by bus driver

PUBLISHED: 09:38 22 October 2008 | UPDATED: 22:30 15 June 2010

AN AXMINSTER mother says she is disgusted a bus driver refused to let her 12-year-old daughter on board because she did not have any identification to prove her age.

AN AXMINSTER mother says she is disgusted a bus driver refused to let her 12-year-old daughter on board - because she did not have any identification to prove her age.Susan Loveridge said her daughter, who she does not wish to name, had been travelling from Charmouth on the number 31 bus - an hourly service - and, with only enough money for the child fare, had to get off the vehicle.The incident took place last Saturday, October 18, at 6.30pm, and Mrs Loveridge fears what could have happened on a dark evening."I was so incensed by it. The driver said it was company policy, but I feel he should have been more humane," she said. "It's completely wrong and irresponsible not to put a child's safety first - there are so many dodgy people around. I'm wary now and worry about what could have happened. "Fortunately she was with a friend and went back to her house and I picked her up from there. But what if she'd been on her own and I couldn't get to her? "Everybody thinks it's absolutely ridiculous. My daughter was very upset by it. The driver flatly refused to believe she was 12 - as if she was pulling a fast one. "She's tall for her age, but it's not her fault. "A lot of girls don't look their age these days. And what can she use for her identification? Her passport? It's a valuable document to carry round."She said it was not the first time her daughter had been questioned about her age, but on the previous occasion the driver had believed her and apologised. Mrs Loveridge is concerned this has happened to other children and could be a recurring problem.Commercial manager Gordon Frost, from First Dorset, said: "We would be very keen to receive full details of this incident so we can investigate."It is not our policy to throw anyone off the bus for not having their fare, particularly children.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Midweek Herald. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Midweek Herald