How to home school children effectively during lockdown

PUBLISHED: 11:00 27 April 2020

Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Diego Cervo

How to home school children effectively during lockdown

Teenage girl using smart phoneTeenage girl using smart phone

At a time when pupils have been thrown into uncertainty surrounding their education and grades, many parents now find themselves tasked with the challenge of supporting their child’s learning from home.

Many parents may feel daunted by the prospect of home schooling, yet there are several useful tools to try to supplement learning as the schools across East Devon remain closed for the time being.

Here are some top tips to help parents continue with their children’s education from home...

Most people agree homework can be beneficial to your child's education.Most people agree homework can be beneficial to your child's education.

1. Get organised and get outside for regular breaks

School days are very well structured. Life at home however can be a different matter. Help your child set up a timetable that will work for them and covers the subjects they need. Divide up periods of study with active breaks. Without their school mates and social interaction, motivation and energy can really drop. Make sure your child moves, goes outside, eats meals at the appropriate times and has offline conversations.

Tired little kid boy at home making homework at the morning before the school starts. Little child doing excercise, indoors. Elementary school and educationTired little kid boy at home making homework at the morning before the school starts. Little child doing excercise, indoors. Elementary school and education

2. Set up their own space to work from with the tools they need

You don’t need to refurb your home. Set up a desk in a quiet corner of the home where your child can keep their laptop, textbooks and notes - they’ll find it much easier to focus and ease distractions for them and the rest of the family. As schools would normally provide things like flashcards, exercise books and planners, it may be worth doing an online shop for some of the basics without blowing the budget.

3. Set good habits around screen times

close up of hands of business person working on computer, man using internet and social mediaclose up of hands of business person working on computer, man using internet and social media

Teens spend a lot of time on apps speaking with their friends - and isolation will only increase their desire to communicate socially. While staying connected will be positive for their mental health, the opposite is true when social media fuels feelings of isolation and anxiety. You’ll need to set some ground rules for how screens are used during the day and keep an eye on your child’s mood.

Online learning platforms

Online tuition and learning resources can ensure that pupils are staying on track with the syllabus, filling in gaps with knowledge, and boosting confidence at a really challenging and confusing time.

For online learning, your child’s school website should be the first port of call. By now, most schools have well established home-learning sections on their websites, with weekly tasks set for the pupils to complete. Several schools use Google Classroom and other virtual tools to deliver education

To support school teaching practices, there are several free educational websites for families to try. Here are a few:

Twinkl - www.twinkl.co.uk - Global educational publisher, Twinkl is providing free access to over 630,000 teaching and learning materials to support teachers, parents and carers in East Devon. The materials available on the Twinkl website range from activity sheets, information packs and interactive presentations to online educational games and videos. These cover all core subjects for all ages and include a huge range mapped to each curriculum in the UK. Teachers, parents and carers in the UK can get access to Twinkl by visiting www.twinkl.co.uk/offer and entering the code CVDTWINKLHELPS alongside an email and password.

BBC Bitesize - www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize - BBC Bitesize has an amazing range of online lessons and activities. The list of modules for each year group is almost endless and covers every topic. There’s even a section on the website offering support for parents and children. The blog is updated daily with tips on how to keep on top of learning outside of school and advice on multiple different subjects children and young adults may find useful.

Staedtler - www.teachersclub.staedtler.co.uk - Parents of children between the ages of four and 11 years will be able to access Staedler’s huge bank of curriculum-linked teaching resources, through the stationery brand’s completely free Teachers’ Club. The Club, normally reserved for primary school teachers only, is now enabling parents to access and download its extremely popular educational tools, designed specifically for pupils in KS1 and KS2.


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