Honiton burglar, reported to police by girlfriend, says sorry

A HONITON woman handed her drug addict boyfriend over to police after she discovered he had burgled fund-raising champion Alan Rowe MBE.

A HONITON woman handed her drug addict boyfriend over to police after she discovered he had burgled fund-raising champion Alan Rowe MBE.

James Collingwood David Trower, 29, admitted stealing hair dressing products and equipment, as well as a charity box, to the value of �947 from Alan Rowe Barbering.

The court heard how his partner called the police after she became suspicious when he came home with the goods on October 2 of last year.

Prosecuting, Mark Haddow said the police recovered the items, which Trower originally claimed he found.

But police traced Trower's DNA from blood left at the scene, after he forced entry onto the property.

The court was told Trower, who has substantial previous convictions, later admitted he stole to fund his drug habit.

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In mitigation, Peter Woodley said Trower, who has a long history of heroin use, had used valium that day and could not remember the details of the burglary.

But he said the father-of-two was trying to turn his life around for the sake of his family and had been spurred on by his partner's actions.

He said: "She's come close to leaving but never quite done it. Now she's called the police and said if he uses heroin again then that's it - and I think this time he actually believes her."

He added that Trower had been attending Exeter, East and Mid Devon Addictions Team (ENDAS) for his drug addiction.

Chairman of the bench Penny Wiles postponed sentencing for a pre-sentence report from the probation service.

She said: "At this stage, we are going to leave all options open, including committal to Crown Court for sentencing."

She said Trower should continue his programme with ENDAS. As part of his bail conditions, the court ordered he reside at Marwood Place and stick to a curfew with an electronic tag. He is expected to return to court on February 5.

Trower told the Herald: "I'm very sorry for what I have done and to the people I have done it to - members of the community. At the time I wasn't of sound mind.

"It hasn't affected my relationship with my partner. I love her and she did what she had to do.

"I was out of order.

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