How Admiral Nurses can help at Christmas

PUBLISHED: 11:00 28 December 2017 | UPDATED: 10:10 03 January 2018

Admiral Nurse Honiton logo. Midweek Herald

Admiral Nurse Honiton logo. Midweek Herald

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Heidi Crook has been an Admiral Nurse since earlier this year, and she has already made a huge difference to families facing dementia in Sid Valley.

Heidi Crook has been an Admiral Nurse since earlier this year, and she has made a huge difference to families facing dementia in Sid Valley.Heidi Crook has been an Admiral Nurse since earlier this year, and she has made a huge difference to families facing dementia in Sid Valley.

Admiral Nurses are specialist dementia nurses working with the entire family of someone with dementia.

Heidi Crook has been an Admiral Nurse since earlier this year, and she has already made a huge difference to families facing dementia in Sid Valley. She will be on hand to provide emotional and practical support to the families facing dementia during this busy festive season and the New Year.

Christmas is a time when families come together over mince pies and board games but it’s also a time of year which can prove particularly difficult for people living with dementia.

The change in routine can be unsettling for a person with dementia, as can any additional noise or upheaval.

But there are things that you can do to minimise the disruption to a person with dementia, and to try and ensure everyone enjoys the festive season as much as possible. These include

1. Being as open as you possibly can about dementia

Explain the situation to people coming over. If you aren’t sure they’ll understand what dementia is, then you can always say that your loved one is having difficulties with conversation and their memory isn’t what it used to be. Also, try to include the person living with dementia in as many decisions about activities and outings around Christmas as possible.

2. Simple communication is key

For tips on how to communicate successfully to a person with dementia have a look at our communication help guide. This is available online or you can request a hard copy from the Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline. The most important thing is to speak slowly and clearly, using simple language and short sentences.

3. Including a person with dementia in the day

Allowing a person with dementia to help out with washing dishes or laying the table can be a great way to preserve their independence. You can also put on their favourite music or look at old photographs to help jog their memories and encourage communication with the people around them. For anyone who needs support living with dementia this festive season, they can get in touch with the Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline.

The Helpline is open from 9am to 9pm on weekdays and 9am to 5pm on weekends, excluding Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.

If you leave a message on one of these days, an Admiral Nurse will call you back once the phone lines reopen.

Call or email on 0800 888 6678 or helpline@dementiauk.org


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