Is it worth going to university?

PUBLISHED: 14:31 24 August 2010 | UPDATED: 14:44 24 August 2010

Abigail Williams, with parents Mark and Nickie.

Abigail Williams, with parents Mark and Nickie.

Archant

Midweek Herald readers share their views.

Jacky Marshall.

COMPETITION for university places is getting tougher as the job market shrinks.

With no guarantee of a top job, or any job, is it still worth going to university?

As A-level results were revealed, the Midweek Herald asked you what you think...

Opinions were divided on the streets of East Devon, with some deeming university a great opportunity - so long as students study “worthwhile” subjects.

Derek Sully.

Sofie Penn-Slater, 16, who hopes to go to university, said: “Young people should be trying as hard as they can to go to university. I definitely think people should go to university – even more so now.”

Her mother, Maddie Penn-Slater, aged 50, said: “Try your best to go somewhere, because, at the end of the day, it will be worth it.”

Derrick Sully, 60, from Axminster, said: “I would say it is a good idea - so long as they don’t study too long.”

Jane Pashley, aged 50, said: “There are more people doing degrees today than when I was at school. It was only for a lucky few, but it seems to be one after another now. For many, they have to take second rate jobs.

“A worthwhile degree, to me, would be in subjects like science, maths or English.

“Some subjects are just not worth a degree.”

Paul Wyle, 35, who is currently studying for a degree in building and surveying, said: “I think it is worth going to university - if you study worthwhile courses that can contribute to the economy and turn it around.

“I would like to see more people doing degrees and working themselves.”

Nickie Williams, 39, said: “I think the big issue is the range of courses people are doing and the debt you come out with.

“If you have the commitment to do it, I think it’s worthwhile - but some are using it as a freebie.”

Mark Williams, 37, added: “You get more qualifications and knowledge, but it is only based on what you did your degree in.”

Jackie Marshall, 46, from Whimple, said: “I don’t think it’s worthwhile at the moment.

“I believe there are a lot of youngsters going to university and the jobs are just not out there.

“There are many other routes to work and people doing vocational studies are taking the jobs before others have finished with their degrees.

“There is lots of skills training on-the-job, where employers can get more for less.”

“The skills graduates are coming out of university with are just not relevant in the work place at the moment and are not anything an employer can use.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Midweek Herald. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Midweek Herald