Jubilee Clock - the beating heart of Seaton

PUBLISHED: 12:24 04 April 2011

jubilee clock in Seaton

jubilee clock in Seaton

Archant

The complete history of resort’s landmark timepiece.

jubilee clock in Seaton

The Jubilee Clock, standing at the top of Sea Hill, was built in 1887 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee.

The foundation stone was laid by the highly-respected Dr Evans, who lived then at Netherhayes.

The site in Sea Hill was given to the town by Sir A W Trevelyan and the 50ft clock tower cost £200.

A hole was cut inside the foundation stone and in it was placed a bottle containing a full set of Jubilee coins. I wonder if they are still there.

The clock itself was made locally by Mr E D Good of Seaton and was removed in 1994 to be replaced by an electric movement.

Jubilee Clock always held a special place in the hearts of all Seatonians, for over 120 years standing like a sentinel on Sea Hill. It not only gave them the time, but became the town’s most familiar landmark.

Locals returning after a long absence from the town knew they were home when they first caught sight of Jubilee clock’s red-brick tower and heard that off-key thud when it struck the hour. The clockworks were made in Seaton by Mr E D Good and, until the 1970s, generations of the Good and Tolman families kept them wound up and maintained.

Following a decision in 1994 to replace the clockworks with electricity, the East Devon District Council presented the clockworks to the museum and nothing has given more pleasure than accepting the works of this old friend for display and preservation for the future.

The neighbouring towns of Lyme Regis, Sidmouth and Honiton take great pride in their historic buildings, surely the people of Seaton could ensure that this red-brick tower should be kept in a fit state of repair for future generations to enjoy?


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