Kilmington wind pump firm’s gusty performance

PUBLISHED: 14:35 06 June 2011

Chris Thorne

Chris Thorne

Archant

Village company’s drainage scheme helps construction firm win award in the “property Oscars”

HELPING to overcome a tricky flooding problem proved a breeze for a Kilmington firm which makes wind-powered pumps.

GB Windpumps provided the turbine to suck up water at a sand and gravel quarry near Doncaster.

And the scheme has been so successful it has won construction materials company Lafarge an award in the “property Oscars.”

The windpump at Finningley took second place and ‘highly commended’ in the sustainability section of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors Pro-Yorkshire Awards 2011.

The windpump was shortlisted down to the last eight in the sustainability category and only narrowly missed out on the top spot to a low carbon building at the University of Bradford.

Christopher Thorne, managing director for GB Windpumps based in The Street, said: “We were thrilled that Lafarge won the award with our windpump.

“GB Windpumps is committed to the development, supply and installation of pumping equipment that uses renewable energy and so makes a positive contribution to the global environment.

“We are delighted Lafarge recognised the need for our effective and aesthetically pleasing windpump and congratulate them on winning this award.”

Lafarge spokesman David Atkinson said: “I was delighted the windpump made it to the last eight but to be awarded second place was a great achievement for the entire team involved in the project.

“The windpump at Finningley is a prime example of our efforts to save energy and reduce carbon emissions while ensuring we resolve issues effectively.”

The Poldaw Windpump, from GB Windpumps, was installed next to part of the quarry, now returned to agricultural land, which was prone to flooding during extremely wet periods.

Traditional pumping systems are energy hungry and account for nearly 20 per cent of global and 32 per cent of UK electricity demand.

Concerned about excessive energy usage and consequent carbon emissions and mindful any solution needed to be low maintenance and low cost in the long term, Lafarge decided on the environmentally friendly windpump option.

The 11m high unit works on a float system, pumping water from a lake next to the restored agricultural fields into new drainage dykes when the level is high and keeping water circulating when levels are acceptable.


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