Lace-inspired transformation for gallery

PUBLISHED: 09:49 11 September 2013 | UPDATED: 09:49 11 September 2013

Preparing for the latest exhibition, IntoLace, at the Thelma Hulbert Gallery. Picture by Alex Walton. Ref mhh 1440-36-13AW. To order your copy of this photograph go to www.midweekherald.co.uk and click on Photo Orders

Preparing for the latest exhibition, IntoLace, at the Thelma Hulbert Gallery. Picture by Alex Walton. Ref mhh 1440-36-13AW. To order your copy of this photograph go to www.midweekherald.co.uk and click on Photo Orders

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Local women help celebrate the town’s lace making heritage at the Thelma Hulbert Gallery in Honiton.

The Thelma Hulbert Gallery (THG) in Honiton has been transformed by a team of local women to celebrate the town’s lace making heritage.

A workforce of 25 local women, including some from Honiton, Luppitt, Dunkeswell, and Gittisham, were selected to join artist Andrea Stokes last week to create the lace-inspired net curtain installations - covering the gallery’s 12 Georgian windows.

The pattern was inspired by a Honiton bobbin lace bonnet dating back to 1790 from Allhallows Museum, which will also be on display at the gallery.

The gallery received an overwhelming response after launching an appeal to find 25 women to take part in the two-day project - there were more than 100 applications.

Artist Andrea Stokes said: “I have really enjoyed having the opportunity to work with local women on this huge collaborative drawing and to make a close connection with the house and the history of women making lace.”

The new installation features as part of the intoLace exhibition, which starts on September 14 until November 2. It brings together artists whose work references lace and is in partnership with Devon Guild of Craftsmen.

Gallery curator Angela Blackwell added: “We have such fantastic local lace heritage in Honiton - THG is really proud to showcase National and South West makers referencing lace in their work to highlight local lace-making and take it to a contemporary audience.”

During the exhibition experienced lace makers from Allhallows Museum will be based in the gallery demonstrating how the craft is still alive today.


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