Let's discuss pensions

PUBLISHED: 02:01 11 June 2008 | UPDATED: 21:54 15 June 2010

JUNE 10 marked the centenary of the Old Age Pension Act, a landmark in the social history of Britain. By 1909 over 500,000 applicants aged 70 and over were receiving their 5/ on 'pension day'. It was made possible by a radical budget introduced by Chancel

JUNE 10 marked the centenary of the Old Age Pension Act, a landmark in the social history of Britain. By 1909 over 500,000 applicants aged 70 and over were receiving their 5/ on 'pension day'. It was made possible by a radical budget introduced by Chancellor Lloyd George (opposed by the House of Lords). From 1925 the age of entitlement was lowered to 65, the pension was increased and, with the coming of the Welfare State in 1946, pensions became a widespread right paid for by contributions; the dream of men like Nye Bevan.Sadly, this vision has since been undermined, as have the NHS and other aspects of the welfare state. Many, especially women, did not qualify for a decent pension. The state pension itself has fallen behind both inflation and average incomes. The age of entitlement, instead of coming down, has gone up and means testing has eroded the principle of right. The welfare state iself is now threatened.I wish to suggest a meeting of all interested people and organisations in Honiton to mark the centenary of 'pension day'. Also to discuss action for the future.This is in the interests of all, not only today's pensioners.Please contact me on (01404) 548228, if you are interested.Tony SimpsonAshleigh RoadHoniton


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