Lyme Lifeboat rescues walkers cut off by tide

PUBLISHED: 09:28 22 July 2013 | UPDATED: 09:28 22 July 2013

Lyme Regis RNLI lifeboat The Spirit of Loch Fyne

Lyme Regis RNLI lifeboat The Spirit of Loch Fyne

Archant

RNLI volunteer crew go to the aid of six people and a dog stranded by the rising sea

Lyme Regis lifeboat went to the aid of six people and a dog cut off by the tide yesterday evening (Sunday).

The crew was scrambled when three women, a man, two children and a golden retriever became stranded at Black Venn, east of the resort.

The alarm was raised by Portland coastguards, and the lifeboat was launched at 5.47pm.

The first person rescued was a 25-year-old man who decided to swim towards Charmouth leaving his sister and the dog on the beach. Lifeboat crew member Murray Saunders advised the man to give up his attempt and escorted him back to the beach.

The lifeboat crew then located two women and two children, a boy aged eight and a girl aged four, also cut off by the tide. A lifeboat crew member waded ashore and waited with them until they could be rescued.

The harbourmaster’s launch was also used in the rescue operation and took the swimmer to Lyme Regis to minimise the risk of the effects of cold.

The two women and two children were also transferred from the lifeboat to the harbourmaster’s launch.

The lifeboat then dropped two crew members ashore to assist the woman and her dog. Both were then taken aboard the lifeboat and returned to Lyme Regis harbour.

All six people and the dog left the lifeboat station at 7.10pm safe and well.

Lyme Regis RNLI helmsman Tim Edwards said: “This was a complicated and lengthy operation, but all these people were in serious difficulty and could have been stranded by the tide well into the night.

“Everyone, including the dog, seemed very pleased that we were able to rescue them.”


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