Lyme-trained sailor misses out on Olympic medal

PUBLISHED: 14:44 08 August 2012

Jim Turner (right) with Kiwi sailing partner Hamish Pepper.

Jim Turner (right) with Kiwi sailing partner Hamish Pepper.

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But Kiwi team of Jim Turner and Hamish Pepper produce a storming finish in the seas off Weymouth

A Lyme Regis-born sailor has failed to win Olympic glory in the seas off Weymouth, despite a storming finish

Former Woodroffe School pupil Jim Turner, 36, missed out on the medals when he competed in the Star class for his adopted country of New Zealand last week.

But he and his partner, Hamish Pepper, managed a brilliant second place in the medal race, pushing the Swedish crew of Fredrik Loof and Max Salminen – eventual gold winners – all the way. It propelled the Kiwi pair from eighth into fifth place overall.

Jim, who honed his yachting skills in the seas off Lyme Regis, said: “We showed that when it’s a bit lighter we’re on the pace. They say you are only as good as your last race and that is our last race.

“We’re really happy with the job we’ve done but disappointed not to have achieved the goal of a medal.”

Jim is the grandson of the late Ron (Sam) Crabb, a Lyme boatman, and the son of Val and Peter Turner, who emigrated to New Zealand some years ago.

He followed his brother Chris in joining Lyme Regis sailing club when he was 10 and quickly showed his potential, progressing to club awards and promotion to the RYA youth squad. He went on to win six world titles in various classes and has been competing as an international yachtsman, including sailing on the British GBR Challenge.

Jim has lived in New Zealand for 10 years, and is married to a New Zealander. The couple have two daughters.

Proud mum Val told The Herald: “He was approached by Hamish Pepper in October 2011 to partner him in the “Star” class for an Olympic challenge. They proved to be very competitive and consequently won the country selection for the Games.”

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