Polluted Honiton: air quality poor in some areas

PUBLISHED: 07:42 25 February 2009 | UPDATED: 23:06 15 June 2010

AIR quality in some parts of Honiton is so poor that action is required.

AIR quality in some parts of Honiton is so poor that action is required.Andrew Ennis, East Devon District Council's environmental health manager, reveals in a report: "Our most recent periodic review and assessment of air quality indicates that, in parts of Honiton, the air quality standard for nitrogen oxide is unlikely to be achieved and some local air quality management is likely to be necessary."District councillors have been warned that individuals who are susceptible to respiratory problems may feel the effects.People suffering from asthma or bronchitis are particularly at risk.Honiton was last year identified as being a hot spot for asthma cases.East Devon District Council is under a legal duty to carry out reviews to assess air quality and the government has set out certain air quality standards that must be achieved.Reporting in the council's Knowledge newsletter last Friday, Mr Ennis said: "Nationally, road transport is estimated to be responsible for about 50 per cent of total emissions of nitrogen oxides. It is not surprising that in Honiton, because of the domination of traffic sources, mean nitrogen oxide levels are highest close to busiest roads."Turks Head junction has long been a source of concern, with air pollution being quoted by town councillors when considering major planning applications in the area.Mr Ennis said: "The recent public inquiry regarding a supermarket's proposals in Honiton is a case in point, where objections were raised due to the predicted increase in traffic."Local transport planning should serve as one of the main mechanisms for improving local air quality through transport and traffic-related measures."The council is to work with the Highways Agency and Devon County Council to integrate its action plan with the Local Transport Plan.ARE you struggling to breathe in Honiton because of air pollution? Send us an email.


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