Researcher gets tips from Seaton Wetlands volunteers

PUBLISHED: 11:00 27 July 2016

Dutch student Lisa van Aalst and Countryside Team Leader Steve Edmonds at Seaton Wetlands

Dutch student Lisa van Aalst and Countryside Team Leader Steve Edmonds at Seaton Wetlands

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Lisa van Aalst, an international development student from a university in the Netherlands, has spent two weeks in Seaton, as part of an eight-week research project.

Seaton Wetlands and its volunteers are at the centre of an international study to see how volunteering is used to help conservation sites.

Lisa van Aalst, an international development student from a university in the Netherlands, has spent two weeks in Seaton, as part of an eight-week research project.

As part of her research, she has been speaking to countryside staff at East Devon District Council (EDDC) and volunteers.

Following the conclusion of the eight-week project, she will write a report about the important role of helpers for the conservation and development at Seaton Wetlands.

Environment portfolio holder, Cllr Iain Chubb said: “Seaton Wetlands is East Devon’s flagship site for wildlife and conservation; it is often used by local school groups and universities for field research.

“Having a visitor from an international university demonstrates the site’s importance, in terms of its wildlife and the role it plays in the local community - providing opportunities for improved health and wellbeing through regular exercise and volunteering.’’

To learn about volunteer tasks, Lisa took part in practical conservation work with EDDC’s ‘Taskforce Tuesday’, as well as meeting with volunteers and staff at the Countryside team to conduct interviews.

Dr Elisabet Dueholm Rasch, coordinator of field research at the University of Wageningen, said: ‘‘Field research plays a vital role in the university students’ learning.


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