Snobs? I've never met them

PUBLISHED: 09:00 14 January 2009 | UPDATED: 22:52 15 June 2010

Peter Draper wrote last week of the snobs and class wannabees inundating the press with anti-Tesco letters. I have been fairly heavily immersed in the campaign for proper regeneration for Seaton for some time, though not as long as others, and have yet t

Peter Draper wrote last week of the snobs and class wannabees inundating the press with anti-Tesco letters. I have been fairly heavily immersed in the campaign for proper regeneration for Seaton for some time, though not as long as others, and have yet to meet either snobs or class wannabes.What I have met are a lot of people passionate about this town, many of whom have witnessed the persistent neglect and general disinterest shown by EDDC as to what happens here. As a coastal town which, for many years, has supported a busy tourist industry, it is EDDC that changed the use on the land from tourism to mixed housing and retail and made it possible for someone to come in and buy up, close down and redevelop what was designated the regeneration area. Regeneration and redevelopment are not the same.Since the Liatris plans were revealed, the full horror of what that would mean for this town galvanised a mass of people to object and show a very real and active interest in what could happen here. This is democracy, Mr Draper, not elitism.Very many of the people willing to stand up for Seaton certainly couldn't afford to shop either at Waitrose or M&S. Many, like me, are living on or below the national wage but that doesn't mean poor people can't have ethics or shouldn't care about their environment. Nor does it mean their opinions can't be aired. As to those who can afford to shop at Waitrose and M&S, are you really suggesting they should also have no voice?When Stand up for Seaton held their advice days to explain what the Liatris plans would mean over 800 people attended, at very short notice and over 800 letters of objection to the plans were sent. At the local elections all eight candidates who had been a part of that public movement were elected to office with a majority turnout. So, Mr Draper, like it or not, when the people speak, either with letters to the council, by voting, or writing to the press, their voices should be heard. And, in a democracy, it is the majority view which should dictate town issues.Lizzie BewsherBy email


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