Spruce up for Seaton school woodland

PUBLISHED: 14:10 22 February 2012

Parents, teachers and pupils in front of the pond and woodlands at Seaton Primary School

Parents, teachers and pupils in front of the pond and woodlands at Seaton Primary School

Archant

Parents join pupils to remove rubbish, clear paths and make a pond fit for frogs

GREEN-THINKING pupils and parents gave up their Saturday off help spruce up the woodlands at Seaton Primary School.

More than 40 adults and youngsters volunteered for the tidy-up, clearing rubbish, making pathways walkable and regenerating the overgrown school pond.

They used shovels, brooms, saws and even their bear hands to clear accumulated debris. In all, the group removed three large bags of weeds and compostable materials, along with a bag of recycling, and re-located frogs to the new pond where they were able to splash around in the clean water.

Children enjoyed making and hanging bird-feeders, building insect homes and learning about the importance of keeping the natural environment clean and safe.

Seaton Primary is a sustainable school that generates energy from its solar panels and wind turbine. Its woodlands are used regularly by the school’s ‘Welly Club’ and by pupils learning about the environment.

The clear up was coordinated by the school PTA and organiser Daisy Forster told The Herald: “We’re really delighted that so many parents and kids came along to support the clear up. Our woodlands are an important part of the school and it’s wonderful that we’ve been able to make this area tidy and beautiful for all the pupils to enjoy.”


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