SURVIVAL One good turn deserves another from Feniton woman

PUBLISHED: 09:01 17 December 2009 | UPDATED: 00:41 16 June 2010

Saved by Americans' generosity.

Saved by Americans' generosity.

Copyright Archant Ltd

A FESTIVE Feniton fundraiser survived cancer thanks to an unbelievable act of kindness, and now hopes her 20-year labour of love can boost children with the illness.

A FESTIVE Feniton fundraiser survived cancer thanks to an unbelievable act of kindness, and now hopes her 20-year labour of love can boost children with the illness.

Brit Sally Beers, 55, couldn't afford treatment for breast cancer when she lived in America in 2001. The country's privatised health system meant she went nine months without any medication.

Her neighbours in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, raised cash that allowed her to get her vital chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

The act of kindness has spurred Sally to use a spectacular miniature Christmas village, which she began collecting in the US 20 years ago, to raise cash for charity.

Her festive scene will be on show at Otter Nurseries until Christmas Eve in the hope it will boost CLIC Sargent, which cares for children with cancer.

"I lost everything including my house in America, the village was one of the few things I brought back with me," said Sally, who is now six years clear of cancer.

"It's got too big for my house and doesn't do anybody any good in boxes. I love it, I'm in my element when this is out. This is what Christmas is about to me.

"I have some wonderful friends in America and I'm very grateful to them. They are the reason I'm here and why I do all this for charity. Mineral Point is twinned with Redruth in Cornwall so they saw me as their English sister."

Sally, who lives in Old Feniton, picked up the first piece of her village, a reindeer barn, in Wisconsin, the American capital of cheese, nearly a quarter of a century ago.

She has since collected items from charity shops, car boot and garage sales.

Sally thanked Pecorama of Beer for donating a Thomas the Tank Engine train to the scene and Skinners of Sidmouth, who handed over a cabinet free of charge.


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