‘Tin hut’ plan horrifies Honiton residents

PUBLISHED: 10:07 07 July 2010

Residents of Dove Close, Honiton.

Residents of Dove Close, Honiton.

Archant

Air polution monitoring station ‘a waste of money’ say those living in Dove Close.

RESIDENTS of a private cul-de-sac in Honiton are fighting plans to base a tin hut on an open space next to their homes so air pollution can be monitored.

East Devon District Council, which has a legal responsibility to assess, monitor and review air quality, has told Dove Close homeowners in a letter that the proposed station is “best described as a metal shed”.

Accompanying photographs, illustrating what an air pollution monitoring station looks like, have horrified residents.

They have described the metal shed as an eyesore, complete waste of money and intrusive. They also fear it will become a magnet for yobs and end up being covered in graffiti.

“If we don’t say anything, we will end up with a mobile phone mast in our midst,” said Kathy Hayward.

George Walker said: “You don’t measure pollution on top a hill, which we are.”

Jenny Gordon is concerned about the cost of the exercise. “It is a bit annoying really that anyone can think of something so daft.

“Why aren’t they saving money?”

Residents are worried the metal shed will be as big, or bigger, than a car and emit noise.

Although an exact location for the monitoring station has not been identified, East Devon District Council has cited the children’s play area in Dove Close.

Mrs Gordon said: “When we bought our properties, we were told that the green is a public area with a children’s playground in the middle. It was a condition put on the developer to provide this.”

John Smith, the council’s environmental health officer, told residents in the letter: “We feel this is a great opportunity to make use of a Government-funded project to provide local information on air quality.”

Residents want to know how much the exercise is costing and say they would rather see a reduction in council tax than have money spent on the monitoring station.

They say the Government-funded project should be scrapped during hard economic times.


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