Toddler group sets £8,000 target for new sensory room in Feniton

PUBLISHED: 16:30 07 June 2017 | UPDATED: 09:15 15 June 2017

Archant

Members of Feniton Baby and Toddler Group have kickstarted the goal which, if reached, will see a room in the village's youth centre, off Silverton Rise, kitted out with the latest sensory equipment.

An ambitious project to raise £8,000 for a new state-of-the-art sensory room in Feniton has been launched.

Members of Feniton Baby and Toddler Group have kickstarted the goal which, if reached, will see a room in the village’s youth centre, off Silverton Rise, kitted out with the latest sensory equipment.

The decision was taken after members of the toddler group, which is run by St Andrew’s Church in Feniton, discovered twenty per cent of children it caters for experience sensory difficulties.

The Rev Danny Beavan, who chairs the toddler group’s committee, said: “The idea behind the sensory room is to provide a play environment where parents and members of the community can take a child to play and develop, using equipment designed for children who have additional needs.

“We have children with a variety of disorders, some who are not mobile and others on the autistic spectrum.

“This room will offer things children to touch and close their hand around, and give them a play experience in a safe place.”

As part of the fundraising process, the group has sought help from the Awards for All fund, part of the the Big Lottery Fund.

The scheme can hand out grants of between £300 and £10,000 for projects that improve communities.

In its application, the group said: “The [sensory room] space would enable children suffering from sensory overload or meltdown to regulate their nervous system and return to the toddler group, rather than having to be excluded from the group.

“The room would also be used as a private space for breast feeding and as a consultation space with other parents over confidential matters.”

The closest sensory room to Feniton Youth Centre is more than 12 miles away – with journeys there on public transport taking just less than an hour and requiring the use of bus and train.

The application added: “Children with sensory difficulties can find public transport extremely challenging and often cannot cope with the lights and sounds around them, leading to meltdowns.

“The nearest group for children with additional needs is 19 miles away and only caters for three to four families per week, demonstrating a clear need for additional provision in the area.”

The group meets at the youth centre every Wednesday from 10am – pop in to find out more.

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