Top notch exhibition for gallery's 10th anniversary

PUBLISHED: 07:23 04 June 2008 | UPDATED: 21:53 15 June 2010

The Thelma Hulbert Galley in Honiton is marking its tenth anniversary with an exhibition of works by one of the foremost sculptors of the 20th century.

The Thelma Hulbert Galley in Honiton is marking its tenth anniversary with an exhibition of works by one of the foremost sculptors of the 20th century.Sculptures, prints and drawings from the archive of Elisabeth Frink will be on display from Saturday, June 7, to Saturday, July 26.The high calibre of the artist's work will mark a milestone in the gallery's progress, from small beginnings to now being recognised as one of the most up-and-coming galleries in Devon.Gallery curator Angela Blackwell said: "Elisabeth Frink was one of the foremost British sculptors of the 20th century. "Her work was always popular with a wide section of the public, however she never compromised her integrity and continued throughout her life to produce startlingly original pieces, displaying a rawness and immediacy, which make for compelling viewing. "Success came remarkably early for her when the Tate Gallery in London bought 'Bird - 1952' while she was still a student at Chelsea School of Art. She fulfilled this early promise, making important public sculptures as well as domestic pieces throughout her life."The exhibition at the Thelma Hulbert Gallery was developed by Sherborne House Arts as a taster show to introduce people to her work. The centrepiece of the exhibition will be the four magnificent 'Tribute Heads' of 1975, which reveal the immense power and deceptive simplicity of her monumental forms. They will be complemented by a selection of smaller sculptures of horses, birds, buffalo and men, as well as a selection of prints and drawings spanning her entire career. Angela added: "Frink grew up under the shadow of the Second World War, experiencing images ranging from the immensely shocking television reportage of the liberation of the Belsen Concentration Camp down to the shooting of animals for food. "These early encounters with the images of death stayed with her and profoundly influenced her work."The material in the exhibition has been loaned by Elisabeth Frink's family.


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