TV Licensing launches campaign to tackle attacks

PUBLISHED: 12:20 09 November 2015

TV Licensing is launching a campaign to tackle the increasing problem of verbal and physical attacks on its enquiry officers

TV Licensing is launching a campaign to tackle the increasing problem of verbal and physical attacks on its enquiry officers

Piranha Photography Ltd

In total, 360 enquiry officers faced physical and verbal assaults in the last financial year, including attacks in Axminster and Honiton.

As part of Anti-Bullying Month, TV Licensing is launching a campaign to tackle the increasing problem of verbal and physical attacks on its enquiry officers who visit unlicensed properties.

Attacks on TV Licensing enquiry officers have more than doubled in the last year. In the last financial year, 89 enquiry officers were victims of physical assaults by members of the public. This is up from 37 in the previous year and included several instances in which staff were admitted to hospital.

In total, 360 enquiry officers faced physical and verbal assaults in the last financial year, including attacks in Axminster and Honiton.

Many officers have had death threats made to them after knocking on doors, while others have been punched and spat at, had TVs thrown at them and also been filmed whilst being abused, with clips posted on YouTube.

Daniel, an enquiry officer from Devon, said: “From verbal abuse to physical, to outright threats, the range of abuse is huge. The worst abuse I received was a threat to kill with a knife.

“Each property that is visited can end with a different result. I get asked quite often ‘you must get a lot of abuse in your job.’

“I will reply with ‘No, I treat people with respect and would appreciate some respect back.’

“I understand my job and what it entails and treat people fairly.”

TV Licensing says some of its officers have had to have counselling following attacks.

Colin Jones, TV Licensing’s field operations director, said: “The threats our officers can receive when they are just trying to carry out their role is completely unacceptable. Those who attack them seem to forget they are human beings.

“They do a great job, remaining professional and courteous in sometimes very challenging circumstances and we do everything we can to support them. This includes reporting serious threats and abuse to the police.”


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