Intricate structures

PUBLISHED: 10:16 22 October 2008 | UPDATED: 22:30 15 June 2010

AN exhibition of print-making by Angie Lewin continues at the Hybrid Gallery, in Honiton High Street, until Saturday, November 15.

AN exhibition of print-making by Angie Lewin continues at the Hybrid Gallery, in Honiton High Street, until Saturday, November 15.

Angie Lewin's work takes the seed heads and skeletal forms of British native plants as her main subject matter. Focusing on their intricate structures, she makes linocuts, wood engravings and lithographs which simplify and celebrate the graphic in their form. Gazing through the stems she sometimes depicts the clifftops and sea beyond or the lochs, mountains and islands of the Scottish Highlands.

Her still life studies combine seedheads, reeds and grasses with favourite ceramics; often '50s classics which reveal her design influences and interests. Her work has appeared on an extensive range of greeting cards and stationery and she has translated it into fabric designs. In 2006, her 'Dandelion' design for St Jude's was one of the four textile nominees in the Elle Deco Design Awards.

Jane Beecham loves to walk the shoreline. She is fascinated by groups of pebbles and the natural arrangements of stones and flotsam left behind by the wash of the tide. Rockpools, too, hold her attention. Beneath the ripples and reflections she gazes into depths to find the pebbles on the floor, the sea fauna and the multitude of colours therein.

Back in the print studio she uses these formations and groupings "blown-up" to fill the image area in colour-saturated monotypes. Overprinting in three colours which mix on paper to create many more and using the strength of ink for intensity and depth, she creates watery, layered images with a translucence and luminosty unique to the method and perfect for her subject matter.


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